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The '''Pax calendar''' was invented by James A. Colligan in 1930 as a [[calendar reform|reform]] of the [[Gregorian calendar]].
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The '''Pax calendar''' was invented by James A. Colligan in 1930 as a [[calendar reform|reform]] of the [[Gregorian calendar]].
   
 
Unlike other proposals such as the [[International Fixed Calendar]] and the [[World Calendar]], it preserves the 7-day week by [[Intercalation|intercalating]] a week to a perpetual year of 52 weeks = 364 days.
 
Unlike other proposals such as the [[International Fixed Calendar]] and the [[World Calendar]], it preserves the 7-day week by [[Intercalation|intercalating]] a week to a perpetual year of 52 weeks = 364 days.
   
The year is divided into 13 months of 28 days, whose names are the same as in the Gregorian calendar except that a month called ''Columbus'' occurs between ''November'' and ''December''. The first day of every week, month and year would be Sunday.
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The year is divided into 13 months of 28 days, whose names are the same as in the Gregorian calendar except that a month called ''Columbus'' occurs between ''November'' and ''December''. The first day of every week, month and year would be Sunday.
   
 
In years that have an extra week, a one-week month called ''Pax'' would be inserted after ''Columbus''.
 
In years that have an extra week, a one-week month called ''Pax'' would be inserted after ''Columbus''.
 
The Pax Calendar proposal is mentioned in the book "Marking Time: The Epic Quest to Invent the Perfect Calendar" (by Duncan Steel, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2000, page 288):
 
:''"As a matter of fact, this leap-week idea is not a new one. and such calendars have been suggested from time to time. ... In 1930, there was another leap-week calendar proposal put forward, this time by a Jesuit, James A. Colligan, but once more the Easter question scuppered it within the Catholic Church."''
 
 
   
 
{| class="wikitable"
 
{| class="wikitable"
! No. !! Name !! Days
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! No. || Name || Days
 
|-
 
|-
 
| 1 || January || 28
 
| 1 || January || 28
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|}
 
|}
   
=== Leap rule ===
 
 
To get the same mean year as the Gregorian Calendar it adds a leap week to 71 out of 400 years. It does so by adding the leap week ''Pax'' to every year whose last two digits make up a number that is divisible by six or are 99. Years ending with 00 have ''Pax'', unless the year number is divisible by 400.
 
To get the same mean year as the Gregorian Calendar it adds a leap week to 71 out of 400 years. It does so by adding the leap week ''Pax'' to every year whose last two digits make up a number that is divisible by six or are 99. Years ending with 00 have ''Pax'', unless the year number is divisible by 400.
   
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Dec 23 leap leap 2030 2036 2041 2047 leap
 
Dec 23 leap leap 2030 2036 2041 2047 leap
 
Dec 22 leap 2042 2048 2053
 
Dec 22 leap 2042 2048 2053
Dec 21 leap 2054
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Dec 21 leap 2054
   
 
The next table shows what happens around a typical turn of the century and also the full range (18 Dec to 6 Jan) of 19 days that the Pax Calendar New Year Day varies against the Gregorian calendar.
 
The next table shows what happens around a typical turn of the century and also the full range (18 Dec to 6 Jan) of 19 days that the Pax Calendar New Year Day varies against the Gregorian calendar.
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*[http://personal.ecu.edu/mccartyr/colligan.html Colligan's Pax Calendar]
 
*[http://personal.ecu.edu/mccartyr/colligan.html Colligan's Pax Calendar]
   
{{Wikipedia}}
 
 
[[Category:Leap Week Calendars]]
 
[[Category:Leap Week Calendars]]
[[Category:Reformed Gregorian calendars]]
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[[Category:Proposed calendars]]
[[Category:Week starts Sunday]]
 
[[Category:400-year leap cycle]]
 
[[Category:13*28]]
 

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